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The Denisovan comes back

... arrived at Prof. S. Pääbo’s laboratory. “In spring 2009 we received a bone fragment from Anatoly Derevyanko… The bone was tiny, and I didn’t pay much attention to it thinking that when we have time, we’ll analyze it for the presence of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Possibly, if the bone appears to be Neanderthal, we’ll be able to measure the degree of this DNA variability in the easternmost Neanderthals…” Today, this find is world famous – ​the primitive Denisovan girl has ...

Modified: 27.06.2018
Altai , hominines , Neanderthal , Denisovan , mitochondrial DNA , primitive man , Denisova Cave
Path: Главная / Articles
In search of the lost genomes

..., we were able to draw on over ten years of experience with the development of techniques to extract and amplify small amounts of DNA from ancient remains of cave bears, mammoths and other late Pleistocene mammals (Pääbo, 2014). We focused on the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), because every cell contains hundreds or even thousands of mtDNA copies, making it easier to retrieve mtDNA than any particular part of the nuclear genome. We reconstructed the most variable part of the mtDNA and estimated ...

Modified: 26.06.2018
paleogenetics , mitochondrial DNA , nuclear DNA , hominid , Neanderthal , Denisovan
Path: Главная / Articles
The man's family tree has branched out

... straight “line”. In light of this concept, the Neanderthal was recognized as the immediate ancestor of man of the modern physical type. However, extensive development of paleogenetic studies at the end of the last century, based on the sequencing of mitochondrial DNA* from fossil bones, suggested that Neanderthals were a dead end in human evolution. This implied that being a separate and reproductively isolated species, an “alternative mankind,” Neanderthals could not have played any prominent ...

Modified: 19.06.2018
paleogenetics , mitochondrial DNA , nuclear DNA , hominid , Neanderthal , Denisovan
Path: Главная / Articles
Where has Homo Sapiens come from?

... (Uzbekistan) discovered the tomb of a Neanderthal with the traces of what was presumably a ritual burial. Prior to the beginning of the 21st century, many anthropologists classified the Neanderthals as an ancestral form of modern humans; however, after mitochondrial DNA from their remains was examined, they were treated as a dead end. The Neanderthals were considered to have been forced out and replaced by modern humans of African descent. Further anthropological and genetic studies have shown, however,...

Modified: 19.06.2018
paleogenetics , mitochondrial DNA , nuclear DNA , hominines , Neanderthal , Denisovan
Path: Главная / Articles
The Pleasure of Discovery, or a Hunt for Hominins

... mind, a logical plan of action, an entire world of ideas that stood behind that action.” No wonder that prior to the beginning of the 21st century, many anthropologists classified the Neanderthals as an ancestral form of modern humans; however, after mitochondrial DNA from their remains was examined, they were treated as a dead end. In 2007, Pääbo’s laboratory investigated the mtDNA from the left femur of the Teshik-Tash Neanderthal child and from the bones found in Okladnikov Cave. Their comparison ...

Modified: 19.06.2018
paleogenetics , mitochondrial DNA , nuclear DNA , hominid , Neanderthal , Denisovan
Path: Главная / Articles
The Pleasure of Discovery, or a Hunt for Hominins

... a logical plan of action, an entire world of ideas that stood behind that action.” No wonder that prior to the beginning of the 21st century, many anthropologists classified the Neanderthals as an ancestral form of modern humans; however, after mitochondrial DNA from their remains was examined, they were treated as a dead end. In 2007, Pääbo’s laboratory investigated the mtDNA from the left femur of the Teshik-Tash Neanderthal child and from the bones found in Okladnikov Cave. Their comparison ...

Modified: 27.10.2017
paleogenetics , mitochondrial DNA , nuclear DNA , hominid , Neanderthal , Denisovan
Path: Главная / Articles
Where has Homo sapiens come from?

... (Uzbekistan) discovered the tomb of a Neanderthal with the traces of what was presumably a ritual burial. Prior to the beginning of the 21st century, many anthropologists classified the Neanderthals as an ancestral form of modern humans; however, after mitochondrial DNA from their remains was examined, they were treated as a dead end. The Neanderthals were considered to have been forced out and replaced by modern humans of African descent. Further anthropological and genetic studies have shown, however,...

Modified: 26.04.2016
paleogenetics , mitochondrial DNA , nuclear DNA , hominines , Neanderthal , Denisovan
Path: Главная / Articles
Hunters for Ancient Genes # Genetic Chronicle of the West Siberian Population in the Paleometal Age

... even from fossilized materials, as well as from currently living individuals. DNA aged thousands of years Paleogenetics as an independent field of study was born only in the mid-1980s, when scientists performed the first analysis of a fragment of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) extracted from the museum remains of quagga, an extinct representative of a species closely related to the horse and zebra, about 140 years old (Higuchi et al. , 1984). Next year, the first paper was published on the analysis ...

Modified: 24.04.2016
Prehistoric human migrations , paleogenetics , ancient DNA , mitochondrial DNA , stable isotopes
Path: Главная / Articles
The man’s family tree has branched out

... straight “line”. In light of this concept, the Neanderthal was recognized as the immediate ancestor of man of the modern physical type. However, extensive development of paleogenetic studies at the end of the last century, based on the sequencing of mitochondrial DNA* from fossil bones, suggested that Neanderthals were a dead end in human evolution. This implied that being a separate and reproductively isolated species, an “alternative mankind,” Neanderthals could not have played any prominent ...

Modified: 18.12.2012
paleogenetics , mitochondrial DNA , nuclear DNA , hominid , Neanderthal , Denisovan
Path: Главная / Articles
Homo Altaiensis?

... the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology (Leipzig) have established that the finger bone found in the Early Upper Paleolithic (40,000—30,000 years ago) occupation layer in Denisova Cave of the Altai Mountains belonged to a human whose mitochondrial DNA is distinct from the mtDNAs of Neanderthals and anatomically modern humans Excavations at Denisova Cave – one of Russia’s best-known archaeological monuments – have been carried out for long. The dozens-meter-thick deposits ...

Modified: 30.08.2010
Pleistocene , Palaeolith , geochronology , paleogenetics , mitochondrial DNA , hominid
Path: Главная / Articles

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